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Rad Tech Research Guide

 Research Strategy - Searching for Books - Print Periodicals - Searching Electronic Resources - Searching the Internet - Web Evaluation - Citing Your Sources


Library Research Strategy

  1. Decide what you want.
  2. Get to know your tools and how to use them.
  3. Refine your search strategy.
  4. Know how to use what you find.

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Searching for Books

In order to find books and media (videos and DVDs) in the library about your topic, use our online catalog. Do a basic search by title, author, subject, or keyword or do an advanced search using two to three keywords (this narrows your search).

Library of Congress Call Numbers

  • alternative medicine - R733
  • diseases/tests/treatment - RC55-71
  • drugs - RM300-RS75
  • managed health care - RA41
  • medical dictionaries - R121
  • radiology/ultrasound - RC78 / R895

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Searching for Periodicals (in Print)

Periodical and newspaper indexes tell you the titles of articles that have been written about your subject along with the dates and page numbers of the magazine or journal in which they appear. For a complete list of periodicals available, see our periodicals title list.

Subject-related Print Periodicals in the OCC Library:

  • JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association  (9 years ago - Current)
  • New England Journal of Medicine  (4 years ago - Current)
  • Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine  (4 years ago - Current)
  • Radiologic Technology (03/1997 - 08/2004, 05/2008 - Current)
  • Radiology  (9 years ago - Current)

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Searching for Periodicals and Books in Electronic Resources

You will want to use the library’s Electronic Resources to help you locate magazine, journal, and newspaper articles, as well as reference books online. This is a list of the most pertinent sources. You can find all of the databases that are available on the library's Periodicals and Electronic Resources page. If you are off campus, you will need to log on with your student ID and last name.

  • MEDLINE - MEDLINE provides authoritative medical information on medicine, nursing, dentistry, veterinary medicine, the health care system, pre-clinical sciences, and much more. Created by the National Library of Medicine, MEDLINE uses MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) indexing with tree, tree hierarchy, subheadings and explosion capabilities to search citations from over 4,800 current biomedical journals. Included are citations from Index Medicus, International Nursing Index, Index to Dental Literature, HISTLINE, SPACELINE, PREMEDLINE®, AIDSLINE®, BIOETHICSLINE®, and HealthSTAR®.
  • Health Reference Center Academic - This database provides full-text access to magazines and scholarly journals on: fitness, pregnancy, medicine, nutrition, diseases, public health, occupational health/safety, alcohol and drug abuse, and prescription drugs.
  • Health Source: Nursing & Academic Edition - This resource provides nearly 550 scholarly full-text journals focusing on many medical disciplines. Coverage of nursing and allied health is particularly strong.
  • Academic OneFile - Database of magazine and journal articles, most of which are available in full-text. You may also limit your search to scholarly journals. Use Subject for broad topics and use Keyword for narrow topics, new words, or combination of terms. Look for articles with Full Text and print or e-mail these.
  • Academic Search Premier - Similar to Academic Onefile, but with different content. Database of magazine and journal articles, most of which are available in full-text. You may also limit your search to scholarly journals.
  • Primal Pictures Radiological Anatomy - This visual, interactive site provides quick, easy access to a complete line-up of three dimensional human anatomy modeling modules. There is also a Functional Anatomy module available.
  • Lexis-Nexis Academic - Provides medical journals and newsletters, along with general magazine, journal, and newspapers on all topics.

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Searching the Internet for Web Sites

The following Web sites will help you find reliable Internet resources that are of good authority for your research paper or presentation.

  • IPL2 - This site was developed by librarians as a reliable and efficient guide to Internet resources. This site is a searchable, annotated subject directory of more than 14,000 Internet resources that have been selected and evaluated by librarians.
  • DMOZ Open Directory Project – This human-edited directory of the Web breaks the topics into sub-topics and also provides “see also” references.
  • Google Advanced Search - Instead of using Google's default search, try the advanced search. There are a lot of tools that will give you better results, such as a box that lets you limit your results to a domain such as .edu or .gov.

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Web Evaluation

Evaluating Web Sites - A quick and useful guide to help you evaluate the Web pages you find for purpose, authority, objectivity, relevance, currency, and responsibility.

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Citing Your Sources

  • Purdue OWL: Research and Citation Resources – A thorough guide to basic research and citing your sources using MLA, APA, and other formats. From Purdue University's online writing lab.
  • Guides to Cite It! – Provides style guides for APA, MLA, Chicago, Turabian, and others. From the University of Georgia Libraries.

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(Vinta M. Oviatt (5/07), updated lc 12/11)